16/02/2010

Cutting Edge

Quick post about yesterdays documentary. I found it really interesting and some of the editors that spoke were really inspirational and made me want to become an editor.. It seems like a bit of a hidden gem within the industry and even though the editor has come to prominence since the likes of Verna Fields, i still feel that nobody truly understands how much they do for the film..

The image below is of the Moviola, it was the original editing machine and was how all of the old films were put together, we have come a long way since the use of this, computers are a lot more helpful and accurate..



Another thing in the documentary that surprised me, was how sexist the industry was in the days of Verna Fields and such characters. Walter Murch said that the industry felt that editing was a more womanly job, it was like stitching, sewing or any other delicate jobs, whereas the men would be introduced when sound came into the equation because it was more of a mans job.. This made me laugh..


Listening to people like Martin Scorsese and Ridley Scott talk was really insightful, and knowing how much an editor actually did took me by surprise a little. Quentin Tarantino is just crazy, his over the top actions and the way he talks is amazing..

4 comments:

  1. Interim Online Review 16/02/10

    Hey Matt,

    I think both story ideas are still too complex - particularly the first, which, as you rightly observe, is too long, and with too much back-story to cram into your Act 1. I suggest you simply assert the existence of the robo-dog, and find the right 'frame narrative' to justify it - for instance, your 1 minute could be constructed as an advertisement or promotional video - eg.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ux3KH3q3_DE
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUgxlRdX_x4

    Or - you could show it development trials - with lots of gags; you know, dog shags inventor's leg... dog chases stick instead of saving guy...

    see

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDUlmjrWw0I

    The joke could simply be 'high-tech robot! (Brain of a dog...)'

    You should use the one minute format to your advantage - and not 'shrink to fit' - you can still set up the 3 acts - 'establish robo-dog' - 'Gag reel or quick-fire set-pieces' - 'Final punchiline or resolution'

    Regarding your written assignment, you want to go for the film that very overtly uses editing to drive the narrative etc. see following posts for general advice re. essay.

    ReplyDelete
  2. “1,500 word written assignment that analyses critically one film in terms of the relationship between story and structure; you should consider camera movement, editing, and the order of scenes”


    While the essay questions asks you to analyse one film in terms of the relationship between story and structure, you are nonetheless expected to contextualise your analysis – and that means you have to widen your frame of reference to include discussion of other, related films and associated ideas – and also the ‘time-line’ within which your case-study sits.

    So, for example, if you are focusing on a scene in a contemporary film which makes dramatic use of montage editing and quick-fire juxtaposition of imagery (the fight scenes in Gladiator, the beach landings in Saving Private Ryan, the bird attacks in The Birds…) no discussion of this scene would be complete without you first demonstrating your knowledge of the wider context for your analysis – i.e., the ‘invisible editing’ approach as championed by W.D. Griffith, and the alternate ‘Eisensteinian’ collisions adopted by Russian filmmakers (and now absorbed into the grammar of mainstream movies). In order to further demonstrate your appreciation for the ‘time-line’ of editing and its conventions, you should make reference to key sequences in key films – ‘The Odessa Steps sequence’ from Sergei Eistenstein’s Battleship Potemkin (as in scene in the Cutting Edge documentary, but also viewable here in full

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ps-v-kZzfec

    Also – if further proof were needed of the influence of this scene, watch

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yH1tO2D3LCI&feature=related

    The Cutting Edge documentary, as shown on Monday 15th Feb, is viewable on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJcQgQHR78Q

    If you choose to quote from any of the ‘talking head’ sections (Ridley Scott, Walter Murch etc.), in support of your discussion, ensure you put the documentary’s original details in your bibliography (as opposed to the You Tube url). For official title and release date etc. visit

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cutting-Edge-Magic-Editing-Region/dp/B0009PVZEG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1266311784&sr=1-1

    Put simply, whatever film you choose to discuss, you will need to link it to its ‘ancestors’ and also, where appropriate, to its ‘children’ – i.e., what influenced it/what it influenced.

    Regarding the ‘language of editing etc.’ the following site is useful – if ugly!

    http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/short/gramtv.html

    I suggest you use it only as a starting point for focusing your research parameters – not as the fount of all knowledge (it isn’t!).

    Something that keeps coming up is how to cite websites using the Harvard Method:

    GO HERE!!!!! IT’S GOT ALL THE ANSWERS!

    http://www.ucreative.ac.uk/index.cfm?articleid=25881

    ReplyDelete
  3. Stylistically, many students’ essays still lack the required formality and tone for a University level written assignment. Many of you write as if you’re ‘chatting’ to your reader or writing a blog entry. This is inappropriate and you need to cultivate a more appropriate style if your discussions are to be authoritative and properly presented. Below are some suggestions re. use of language; take note and use!

    Use good, formal English and grammar,
    
see: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/internet-grammar/home.htm

    Use objective language: e.g. rather than 'I find it difficult to identify ...'

    'It is often difficult to identify...'
    'It can be seen that...
    'There are a number of...'

    Adopt a cautious academic style; avoid conclusive statements: e.g. use may, might, it seems that, appears to, possibly, probably, seemingly, the evidence suggests that, it could be argued that, research indicates...

    Avoid assumptions and generalisations: e.g. everyone can see, everybody knows, public opinion is...

    If you make a statement, always present evidence to support it.

    Within your essay you will be hoping to demonstrate or prove something. You will have a point of view that you wish to convey to your reader. In other words, your essay should 'say' something.

    You should support what you wish to say with a reasoned argument and evidence.

    A reasoned argument consists of a series of logical steps you make in order to lead to a point where you can form some sort of judgement on the issue you have been examining, or come to some sort of conclusion.

    Paragraphs are organised in order to build your argument in a series of logical steps

    A typical paragraph is concerned with a single step in your argument

    The first sentence of a paragraph is the topic sentence. It clearly states which step in your argument you intend to deal with in this paragraph

    Subsequent sentences explain, define and expand upon the topic sentence

    Evidence is offered

    Evidence is commented on

    A conclusion may be reached

    Try to make each paragraph arise out of the previous paragraph and lead into the subsequent one

    Below are some useful ‘linking’ words and phrases that suit the formal tone of an academic assignment – get used to using them to structure clear, articulate and confident sounding sentences.

    To indicate timescales:
    when, while, after, before, then

    To draw conclusions:
    because, if, although, so that, therefore

    To offer an alternative view:
    however, alternatively, although, nevertheless, while
    To support a point:
    or, similarly, incidentally

    To add more to a point:
    also, moreover, furthermore, again, further, what is more, in addition, then
    besides, as well
    either, not only, but also, similarly, correspondingly, in the same way, indeed
    with respect to, regarding

    To put an idea in a different way:
    in other words, rather, or, in that case
    in view of this, with this in mind
    to look at this another way

    To introduce and use examples:
    for instance, for example, namely, an example of this is
    such as, as follows, including
    especially, particularly, notably

    To introduce an alternative viewpoint:
    by contrast, another way of viewing this is, alternatively, again,
rather, another possibility is..
    conversely, in comparison, on the contrary, although, though

    To return to emphasise an earlier point:
    however, nonetheless, despite, in spite of
    while.. may be true
    although, though, at the same time, although.. may have a good point

    To show the results of the argument:
    therefore, accordingly, as a result
    so, it can be seen that
    resulting from this, consequently, now
    because of this, hence, for this reason, owing to, this suggests
 that, it follows that
    in other words, in that case, that implies

    To sum up or conclude:
    therefore, in conclusion, to conclude, on the whole
    to summarise, to sum up, in brief, overall, thus

    ReplyDelete
  4. As part of your forthcoming Animation project (Unit 5), you will be participating in a series of 2D animation workshops with Meg Bisineer – a sessional lecturer coming to us from the Royal College of Art.

    Meg has asked that you equip yourselves with an ‘animator’s tool kit’. She recommends that you visit www.chromacolour.co.uk and purchase the following items BEFORE your first workshop on Friday 12th March.

    Economy grade 60gsm A4 punched (1000 sheets – pre-punched) - £22.99

    http://www.chromacolour.co.uk/store/animation_paper_economy.asp

    3-Pin Plastic Pegbar - £2.99

    http://www.chromacolour.co.uk/store/animation_pegbars.asp

    The pre-punched paper and the pegbar are both necessary for the effective registration of your drawings. You will be working on your own individual A4 lightboxes – which the course is providing. Yes, it’s going to cost you some money, but the pre-punched paper and pegbar will save you a great deal of time and prep. See below for further requirements for your animator’s tool kit

    1) Sketchbooks: at least A5 size or bigger.

    2) Pencils: HB & 2B.

    3) Eraser / Sharpeners.

    4) A blue or red colour pencil.

    5) A4 paper - 60 gsm (60-80 sheets)*

    6) A strip of thick cardboard : 15cm x 2 cm*

    7) Masking tape*

    8) Paper knife*

    9) Ruler*

    *Note – these items are necessary if you DON’T order the specified supplies from Chromacolour – as Meg will show you a basic way to create an alternate means of registration.

    In terms of paper cost – share a box with a classmate and split the costs. The weight of the paper is important (60gsm) because it is translucent, thus allowing you to see through it to your previous drawings.

    Also – if you haven’t got your hands on a copy yet, you should get hold of the following

    The Animator's Survival Kit : A manual of methods, principle and formulas for classical, computer, games, stop motion and internet animators: by Richard Williams, published by Faber and Faber.

    The Fundamentals of Animation by Paul Wells, published by AVA Publishing.

    Meg has designed a very thorough curriculum for your 4 workshops - be amazing!



    Can you please circulate this information - not all your classmates are following this blog!

    ReplyDelete